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    1. HONG KONG — Talk of an economic slowdown in China has become so loud and persistent that it now has its own slang: ghost cities, ghost fleets, rocket eggs, naked officials. The downturn has even led to the invention of a new financial algorithm, something called the China Stress Index — and the index remains high.

      Some of the stresses were mentioned over the weekend by Prime Minister Wen Jiabao as he spoke of “huge downward pressure” on the world’s No. 2 economy, due principally, he averred, to slackening consumer demand in Europe and real estate speculation at home.

      As my colleague Keith Bradsher reports, housing construction has nearly stopped. Work sites that had recently been going round the clock seven days a week are now down to one shift — and just on weekdays.

      Analysts and government planners are now resigned to the fact that the growth rate in 2012 will slip under the once-magic (and numerologically auspicious) figure of 8 percent. Instead, keeping growth above 7 percent has become the immediate task at hand, especially with the important 18th Party Congress coming this autumn.

      Nomura, the Japanese financial services firm, has launched the China Stress Index, and the Nomura analyst Rob Subbaraman affirmed Monday that the company sees “a one-in-three probability” that China will experience “a hard economic landing commencing before the end of 2014.”

      Foreign Policy magazine has a new overview of the economy called “Five Signs of the Chinese Economic Apocalypse.” (Business Insider sees that bet, and triples it, with a story headlined “Fifteen Reasons Why Everyone Is Suddenly Freaking Out About China.”)

      In making its case for apocalypse now, or soon, the Foreign Policy piece says, “Businesses are taking fewer loans. Manufacturing output has tanked. Interest rates have unexpectedly been cut. Imports are flat. GDP growth projections are down, with some arguing that China might already be in recession.”

      Government figures released Monday showed that consumer prices dropped 0.6 percent in June compared with May, raising the concern of deflation, as Keith reports.

      Meanwhile, though, some food prices have risen so sharply (and food contamination scares have been so profound) that people are increasingly growing their own vegetables and more folks are keeping pigs. Mainland chickens are now laying “rocket eggs,” a reference to their price trajectory.

      Local governments, after years of massive and prideful investments, are now seeing loans coming due. (How many of these loans are already underperforming is a matter of some debate among economists and analysts.)

      The central government in Beijing is even insisting on some austerity now, from sell-offs of the fleets of luxury cars assigned to local bosses to cutbacks on high-end liquor and nosh at official banquets.

      Some of the (few) more bullish analysts speak admiringly of the robustness of the state banking system and Beijing’s ability to manipulate the levers of its highly controlled economy. But when they start listing areas of deep concern, they can barely come up for air.

      Sales of luxury goods in China, for example, are slowing. Wealthy mainlanders, including government and party officials, are feverishly offshoring their cash by buying properties abroad, from Hong Kong and Macau to Australia, Europe and the United States. Hedging against possible political or economic upheavals, they are keeping so few (seizable) assets in China that they’re being called luo guan — “naked officials.”

      Coal, iron ore and copper also are piling up in China, which has led Chinese shippers, once happy to ply the coastal routes, to head for blue water in search of new business. In a new blog post — “Is China Running Out of Steam?” — Evan Osnos of The New Yorker called this “the freight equivalent of deer wandering out of the woods in search of food. Because it materialized out of the shadows, shipping people have named it the ‘ghost’ fleet.”

      There are plenty of China experts in the gloom camp, and some in the doom camp. In a recent Barron’s piece called “Falling Star,” Jonathan Laing took the temperature of Jim Chanos, “the most outspoken Sino-Skeptic” on Wall Street.

      Never one to mince words, Chanos contends that China is headed for a hard landing of epic proportions because of its shaky financial system and an imminent collapse in its property market, which undergirds the entire economy. “I’m being conservative when I say that the coming bust in China’s real-estate market will be a thousand times that of Dubai,” he told Barron’s.

      After a recent trip to China, Rosemary Righter wrote in The Times Literary Supplement of “tens of millions of houses and apartments as well as Ozymandian public buildings and factory estates — and what hits the eye is how much of it all stands empty. Across the country, uninhabited concrete blocks scab the land, not only in the megacities of the eastern seaboard but also in the sleepier southwest; from filthy mining towns in Henan, all the way to entire ghost towns in Inner Mongolia.”

      Mr. Laing also got a diagnosis from Edward Chancellor, a global strategist for GMO, the investment management firm based in Boston.

      “I can’t tell you precisely when the downturn will hit,” he says. “No one can. All I know is that China has all the earmarks of a classic mania that will end badly — a compelling growth story that seduces investors into ill-starred speculation, blind faith in the competence of Chinese authorities to manage through any cycle, and over-investment in fixed assets with inadequate returns facilitated by an explosion in credit.”

      Calling China a “Field of Dreams” economy — if we build it, they will come — he mentioned “a highway system with sparse traffic, local airports running at half-capacity and the rapidly expanding national high-speed railroad system, a technical marvel that can’t charge ticket prices sufficient to pay for itself.”

    2. HONG KONG — Talk of an economic slowdown in China has become so loud and persistent that it now has its own slang: ghost cities, ghost fleets, rocket eggs, naked officials. The downturn has even led to the invention of a new financial algorithm, something called the China Stress Index — and the index remains high.

      Some of the stresses were mentioned over the weekend by Prime Minister Wen Jiabao as he spoke of “huge downward pressure” on the world’s No. 2 economy, due principally, he averred, to slackening consumer demand in Europe and real estate speculation at home.

      As my colleague Keith Bradsher reports, housing construction has nearly stopped. Work sites that had recently been going round the clock seven days a week are now down to one shift — and just on weekdays.

      Analysts and government planners are now resigned to the fact that the growth rate in 2012 will slip under the once-magic (and numerologically auspicious) figure of 8 percent. Instead, keeping growth above 7 percent has become the immediate task at hand, especially with the important 18th Party Congress coming this autumn.

      Nomura, the Japanese financial services firm, has launched the China Stress Index, and the Nomura analyst Rob Subbaraman affirmed Monday that the company sees “a one-in-three probability” that China will experience “a hard economic landing commencing before the end of 2014.”

      Foreign Policy magazine has a new overview of the economy called “Five Signs of the Chinese Economic Apocalypse.” (Business Insider sees that bet, and triples it, with a story headlined “Fifteen Reasons Why Everyone Is Suddenly Freaking Out About China.”)

      In making its case for apocalypse now, or soon, the Foreign Policy piece says, “Businesses are taking fewer loans. Manufacturing output has tanked. Interest rates have unexpectedly been cut. Imports are flat. GDP growth projections are down, with some arguing that China might already be in recession.”

      Government figures released Monday showed that consumer prices dropped 0.6 percent in June compared with May, raising the concern of deflation, as Keith reports.

      Meanwhile, though, some food prices have risen so sharply (and food contamination scares have been so profound) that people are increasingly growing their own vegetables and more folks are keeping pigs. Mainland chickens are now laying “rocket eggs,” a reference to their price trajectory.

      Local governments, after years of massive and prideful investments, are now seeing loans coming due. (How many of these loans are already underperforming is a matter of some debate among economists and analysts.)

      The central government in Beijing is even insisting on some austerity now, from sell-offs of the fleets of luxury cars assigned to local bosses to cutbacks on high-end liquor and nosh at official banquets.

      Some of the (few) more bullish analysts speak admiringly of the robustness of the state banking system and Beijing’s ability to manipulate the levers of its highly controlled economy. But when they start listing areas of deep concern, they can barely come up for air.

      Sales of luxury goods in China, for example, are slowing. Wealthy mainlanders, including government and party officials, are feverishly offshoring their cash by buying properties abroad, from Hong Kong and Macau to Australia, Europe and the United States. Hedging against possible political or economic upheavals, they are keeping so few (seizable) assets in China that they’re being called luo guan — “naked officials.”

      Coal, iron ore and copper also are piling up in China, which has led Chinese shippers, once happy to ply the coastal routes, to head for blue water in search of new business. In a new blog post — “Is China Running Out of Steam?” — Evan Osnos of The New Yorker called this “the freight equivalent of deer wandering out of the woods in search of food. Because it materialized out of the shadows, shipping people have named it the ‘ghost’ fleet.”

      There are plenty of China experts in the gloom camp, and some in the doom camp. In a recent Barron’s piece called “Falling Star,” Jonathan Laing took the temperature of Jim Chanos, “the most outspoken Sino-Skeptic” on Wall Street.

      Never one to mince words, Chanos contends that China is headed for a hard landing of epic proportions because of its shaky financial system and an imminent collapse in its property market, which undergirds the entire economy. “I’m being conservative when I say that the coming bust in China’s real-estate market will be a thousand times that of Dubai,” he told Barron’s.

      After a recent trip to China, Rosemary Righter wrote in The Times Literary Supplement of “tens of millions of houses and apartments as well as Ozymandian public buildings and factory estates — and what hits the eye is how much of it all stands empty. Across the country, uninhabited concrete blocks scab the land, not only in the megacities of the eastern seaboard but also in the sleepier southwest; from filthy mining towns in Henan, all the way to entire ghost towns in Inner Mongolia.”

      Mr. Laing also got a diagnosis from Edward Chancellor, a global strategist for GMO, the investment management firm based in Boston.

      “I can’t tell you precisely when the downturn will hit,” he says. “No one can. All I know is that China has all the earmarks of a classic mania that will end badly — a compelling growth story that seduces investors into ill-starred speculation, blind faith in the competence of Chinese authorities to manage through any cycle, and over-investment in fixed assets with inadequate returns facilitated by an explosion in credit.”

      Calling China a “Field of Dreams” economy — if we build it, they will come — he mentioned “a highway system with sparse traffic, local airports running at half-capacity and the rapidly expanding national high-speed railroad system, a technical marvel that can’t charge ticket prices sufficient to pay for itself.”
      HONG KONG — Talk of an economic slowdown in China has become so loud and persistent that it now has its own slang: ghost cities, ghost fleets, rocket eggs, naked officials. The downturn has even led to the invention of a new financial algorithm, something called the China Stress Index — and the index remains high.

      Some of the stresses were mentioned over the weekend by Prime Minister Wen Jiabao as he spoke of “huge downward pressure” on the world’s No. 2 economy, due principally, he averred, to slackening consumer demand in Europe and real estate speculation at home.

      As my colleague Keith Bradsher reports, housing construction has nearly stopped. Work sites that had recently been going round the clock seven days a week are now down to one shift — and just on weekdays.

      Analysts and government planners are now resigned to the fact that the growth rate in 2012 will slip under the once-magic (and numerologically auspicious) figure of 8 percent. Instead, keeping growth above 7 percent has become the immediate task at hand, especially with the important 18th Party Congress coming this autumn.

      Nomura, the Japanese financial services firm, has launched the China Stress Index, and the Nomura analyst Rob Subbaraman affirmed Monday that the company sees “a one-in-three probability” that China will experience “a hard economic landing commencing before the end of 2014.”

      Foreign Policy magazine has a new overview of the economy called “Five Signs of the Chinese Economic Apocalypse.” (Business Insider sees that bet, and triples it, with a story headlined “Fifteen Reasons Why Everyone Is Suddenly Freaking Out About China.”)

      In making its case for apocalypse now, or soon, the Foreign Policy piece says, “Businesses are taking fewer loans. Manufacturing output has tanked. Interest rates have unexpectedly been cut. Imports are flat. GDP growth projections are down, with some arguing that China might already be in recession.”

      Government figures released Monday showed that consumer prices dropped 0.6 percent in June compared with May, raising the concern of deflation, as Keith reports.

      Meanwhile, though, some food prices have risen so sharply (and food contamination scares have been so profound) that people are increasingly growing their own vegetables and more folks are keeping pigs. Mainland chickens are now laying “rocket eggs,” a reference to their price trajectory.

      Local governments, after years of massive and prideful investments, are now seeing loans coming due. (How many of these loans are already underperforming is a matter of some debate among economists and analysts.)

      The central government in Beijing is even insisting on some austerity now, from sell-offs of the fleets of luxury cars assigned to local bosses to cutbacks on high-end liquor and nosh at official banquets.

      Some of the (few) more bullish analysts speak admiringly of the robustness of the state banking system and Beijing’s ability to manipulate the levers of its highly controlled economy. But when they start listing areas of deep concern, they can barely come up for air.

      Sales of luxury goods in China, for example, are slowing. Wealthy mainlanders, including government and party officials, are feverishly offshoring their cash by buying properties abroad, from Hong Kong and Macau to Australia, Europe and the United States. Hedging against possible political or economic upheavals, they are keeping so few (seizable) assets in China that they’re being called luo guan — “naked officials.”

      Coal, iron ore and copper also are piling up in China, which has led Chinese shippers, once happy to ply the coastal routes, to head for blue water in search of new business. In a new blog post — “Is China Running Out of Steam?” — Evan Osnos of The New Yorker called this “the freight equivalent of deer wandering out of the woods in search of food. Because it materialized out of the shadows, shipping people have named it the ‘ghost’ fleet.”

      There are plenty of China experts in the gloom camp, and some in the doom camp. In a recent Barron’s piece called “Falling Star,” Jonathan Laing took the temperature of Jim Chanos, “the most outspoken Sino-Skeptic” on Wall Street.

      Never one to mince words, Chanos contends that China is headed for a hard landing of epic proportions because of its shaky financial system and an imminent collapse in its property market, which undergirds the entire economy. “I’m being conservative when I say that the coming bust in China’s real-estate market will be a thousand times that of Dubai,” he told Barron’s.

      After a recent trip to China, Rosemary Righter wrote in The Times Literary Supplement of “tens of millions of houses and apartments as well as Ozymandian public buildings and factory estates — and what hits the eye is how much of it all stands empty. Across the country, uninhabited concrete blocks scab the land, not only in the megacities of the eastern seaboard but also in the sleepier southwest; from filthy mining towns in Henan, all the way to entire ghost towns in Inner Mongolia.”

      Mr. Laing also got a diagnosis from Edward Chancellor, a global strategist for GMO, the investment management firm based in Boston.

      “I can’t tell you precisely when the downturn will hit,” he says. “No one can. All I know is that China has all the earmarks of a classic mania that will end badly — a compelling growth story that seduces investors into ill-starred speculation, blind faith in the competence of Chinese authorities to manage through any cycle, and over-investment in fixed assets with inadequate returns facilitated by an explosion in credit.”

      Calling China a “Field of Dreams” economy — if we build it, they will come — he mentioned “a highway system with sparse traffic, local airports running at half-capacity and the rapidly expanding national high-speed railroad system, a technical marvel that can’t charge ticket prices sufficient to pay for itself.”

    3. Definitely not the real Amy, the real one wouldn’t be able to hold a thought together longer then where her next fix is coming from.

    1. Make sure the POS country you live in and the leaders who run it are notified by you to stop taking American dollars to prop you up. Make sure they know you say Fuck no to America and American goods so we can sit back and see how you do. OK there bub?

    2. Its funny, because if Top Dog got his way, we’d all sit back and watch America burn out. America is first in the world in something – External debt!!! Without the rest of the World, USA would be fucked. SO, Top Dog, it is our “POS” countries that keep you alive! You don’t have to thank us, just respect us enough to not call us POS countries. Twat!

    3. @TOP DOG – American goods are shit. We don’t make anything that can’t be found elsewhere and for cheaper. I’m sure they’ll be just fine. Bub.

  1. This shouldn’t qualify for Epic Fail. It’s from a movie. If it were some kid at his graduation speech, etc., it would be good. Whoever posted this needs a kick in the nuts and a bitch smack.

    1. And yet with “nothing good” we still use POS countries like the one you live in as outhouses. Speaks volumes about your home.

    2. can’t imagine why everyone thinks we’re idiots with people like Top Dog representing us.

    3. I think Top Dog is a little butthurt that this video cut to his very core and pointed out most of what he believes to be immature and idiotic.

    4. This guy has it down 100%… Uhmericans just can’t accept the fact that we aren’t #1 anymore. Sad but true…

  2. America The Great…. BUT God DAMN!!!! FRED live in America……. Can someone send FRED back to MEXICO!!!!!!!!! PLEASEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!

    1. what is it that you’re trying to accomplish with this, really?
      2lolo is an idiot. we already knew that. you’re just beating a dead horse. or beating a dead horse off, as you would probably put it.

    2. which is probably the point, but it would be nice if he at least put some effort into his trolling instead of just copy/pasting the same sentence 500 times.

    3. Completely agree Rippy.

      When I drop into the comments I have to scroll past this idiot’s statements just to see what people are saying.

    4. I apologize, but it’s not for your benefit. I thought I’d try fighting fire with fire, see how it works. Troll the troll, as it were.

    5. And by the way, there’s like 3 of us. So don’t hold us all accountable, we’re all trying different tactics.

  3. The pacific, band of brother, the boardwalk empire, games of thrones and now the newsroom…. it’s just HBO…

  4. America, the only place where you hear that speech and it’s more relevant in which movie this guy was…problem.

  5. America
    The land of the free and the home of the brave?
    Where those that act out are called misbehaved
    We lock them in jails to never be seen
    Or to ever hear words, “let freedom ring”
    A land stand united, to never see fall
    That was truly forgotten, no more “one for all”
    The needs of the few outweigh the many
    For money and power, when is enough plenty?
    Be that as it may, the numbers still grow
    A country that prospers, with nowhere to go
    College grads out with degrees in the dark
    No one to guide us or show where to start
    The pioneers past no longer to lead
    We look up to presidents, for our vote they will plead!
    Our words mean nothing, they go unheard
    So with actions I speak call them loud verbs
    Our money is less than its ever been
    A dollar today should really be $10
    But no worries for me cause im one in 7 billion
    Another blip on the radar of Americas millions
    We get herded like cattle, and fed shit like ‘shrooms
    Left in the dark of individual rooms
    Taught to go right, and sometimes left
    We steal others thoughts, intellectual theft
    But don’t use them as yours, unless in a quote
    So everyone knows, it wasn’t you that wrote
    So this july 10th I will share my views
    tell the world what I think we should do
    stand up for the beaten, the broken and down
    pick up the garbage that lay around town
    you need to start small
    no big tasks in mind
    and a better person inside you will find
    that true American what we once stood for,
    a land of opportunity, where everyone’s poor
    and no one is judged by their money and wealth
    so extend a free hand, and just call it “help.”

  6. the wrighters for that show should b applauded… 😀
    it takes courage to write something so true, and then the man who played this part did an amazing job!!! Bravo!

  7. he spits the truth tho… its not being unpatriotic to realize that something isnt going the way it should. Theres a lot of problems in the USA right now, and honestly, burying your head in the sand doesnt still make you number one.

  8. As someone who is half-American and growing up in the states I used to be proud of that side of my heritage.

    Looking at that country now I no longer can call it home because it resembles nothing of the place I used to love.

    This speech exemplifies what is wrong with that country and if it can turn back to the things it pursued and strived for it could once again be the greatest country in the world.

  9. What he says after in the second half on how America used to be is 100 percent the reason why America was such a super power back in the day.

    1. America was one of the first super industrial powers and that strength added greatly to the effort in WWII. But it was that power displayed and the fear during the Cold war that led to the decline of American might. It’s zenith was landing on the moon in 69. Since then it’s been fairly dormant in terms of it’s contributions and accomplishments. Oil wars, political manipulation in South America and the middle east through election rigging or straight out assassinations,recent drone strikes, the silent monitoring of it’s own citizens without warrants or, even just cause, indefinite detentions, torture, chemical manipulation of agriculture, and military overdrive. 100+ bases around the world protecting economic interests. No, America is not dead but it’s certainly not #1.

  10. I see no error in the tv show character’s logic. America was great once but it’s a shell of it’s former self.

  11. We aren’t the greatest country in the world, yet millions come here every year to live the American Dream. That happens nowhere else in the world. GOD BLESS THE USA!!!

  12. First of all, so what if we’re not number one. I’m glad I live here, and not in another “free” country. You don’t like living here, move.
    Secondly, can we not get 2lolo barred from this site? “It” is truly stupid.

    1. i agree with you donna if you are happy where you live then what the hell does it matter what others think about it if you dont like where you live fucking leave

      oh and i type without , . / ; ” or ! because its faster 😛
      and ffcourse because ima dumb dutchy 🙂 dunno where to put them properly

    1. Chinas economy relys on American buisnesses. If China waged war with the US they would sink below the poverty line in an instant. Not to mention our AIR FORCE , NAVY AND Army are 1000 miles ahead of China technologically wise. Oh and Chine has no way of reaching the US… but the UNITED STATES CAN REACH THEM… who do u think would win ?

  13. The rant is courageous as it is bold. If we’re so free, why is it we live in fear of calling the corps, politicians, policies, etc.. corrupt (saying the least) when they are. gop worships ignorance and conflict their policies coupled with dfl’s has compromised our Democracy as a whole. There is no time left. There is no napping. The hard work has only just begun. The two generations before this one fell asleep at the wheel of our democracy. Too we have been inundated with meme’s that propagate complacency, helplessness and illusions.

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